Conclusion

It is telling that much of the law governing privacy in the workplace actually protects employers from liability for invasion of privacy claims brought by employees. In this way the law reflects a general understanding among the American public that the workplace is essentially a place for commerce, productivity, and human interaction, but normally not a place for privacy or seclusion.

For the most part, employees themselves realize that the employer owns the company and expends the resources to make it profitable. Employees generally want to be efficient and productive so they can receive better reviews and better raises. Consequently, the law gives employers wide latitude and ample discretion in dictating how their businesses will be run. On the other hand, an individual does not abandon his or her privacy rights at the employer’s front door. Instead, the law puts in place certain checks to prevent employers from overstepping boundaries, abusing their positions of power and authority, and running their businesses in a manner deemed highly offensive or objectionable to the average person.


Inside Conclusion